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Bypass surgery for a blocked bile duct

You may be offered bypass surgery for a blocked bile duct if you can’t have a stent, or you have had a stent but it hasn’t worked. This operation is called a choledochojejunostomy.

What happens during the operation?

Bypass surgery generally takes two to four hours. The bile duct will be cut above the blockage and reconnected to the small intestines. This allows the bile to flow again.

The operation may be open surgery, when one large cut (incision) is made in the tummy. In some hospitals you might be able to have this done by keyhole (laparoscopic) surgery. Several small cuts are made in the tummy. A long thin tube with a camera on the end (called a laparoscope) is inserted through one hole. The surgeon then inserts surgical instruments through the other holes, guided by the images from the laparoscope.

Before bypass surgery for a blocked bile duct

Before Bypass Surgery For A Blocked Bile Duct

After bypass surgery for a blocked bile duct

After Bypass Surgery For A Blocked Bile Duct

If you have any questions or concerns about having bypass surgery, speak to your medical team. You can also speak to our specialist nurses on our free Support Line.

Bypass surgery for a blocked duodenum

Recovering from bypass surgery

Benefits and risks of bypass surgery

Side effects from bypass surgery

Published February 2017

Review date February 2019

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