NHS England announce new trial for a blood test to detect multiple cancers

We comment on NHS England's announcement about a new trial for a blood test that could improve early diagnosis for pancreatic and other cancers.

Communications team
|
27 November 2020

NHS England have announced a new trial for a blood test that could improve early diagnosis for pancreatic and other cancers, as reported on BBC News here.

Diana Jupp, CEO of Pancreatic Cancer UK:

“It’s fantastic to see investment in such a large-scale pilot with the ambition to improve early diagnosis, not just for well-known cancers, but also for devastating diseases like pancreatic cancer that have been overlooked for so long.

Three in five people with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed at an advanced stage. The lack of a simple test leaves thousands of families in the UK each year hearing the most heart-breaking news: that their loved one cannot have lifesaving treatment because it’s simply too late.

This innovative blood test could make a real difference. However, it will be some time before we can know if it is both sensitive and accurate enough to help us overcome the biggest challenge to improving survival for the deadliest common cancer.

Early diagnosis research is crucial for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic Cancer UK has been investing in the development of a simple test specifically for pancreatic cancer through the Early Diagnosis Research Alliance. We very much welcome this news to further accelerate progress in this underfunded area of research.

The last few weeks have shown all of us just how much can be achieved if we invest in this country’s brightest scientists. It’s now imperative that this pilot marks the beginning of sustained research investment by Government, so that we can transform the future for people affected by pancreatic cancer and other less survivable cancers.”

Early diagnosis research is crucial for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic Cancer UK has been investing in the development of a simple test specifically for pancreatic cancer through the Early Diagnosis Research Alliance.

Diana Jupp, Chief Exec Pancreatic Cancer UK