Career Foundation Fellowships

Supporting talented researchers with an interest in pancreatic cancer to take the next step in their career

Pancreatic cancer is tough to research. Underlying all the challenges is that in order to drive forward progress and make research breakthroughs, we need to grow the pancreatic cancer research community and invest in the future leaders of this field.  

Fellowships support talented researchers with an interest in pancreatic cancer to take ownership of a piece of work, take the next step in their career and work towards an independent research career. This dedicated funding also provides them with protected time to concentrate on research, free from clinical and teaching responsibilities.  

Career Foundation Fellowships provide early career researchers the opportunity to develop the skills and build experience needed to take the first step towards becoming an independent investigator.  

Our Head of Research, Dr Chris Macdonald, explains “One of the underlying difficulties is that we desperately need more researchers to drive forward the great body of work that is necessary to make progress in early detection, and improve treatment and care. 

We are thrilled that we are now able to fund and support fellowships at Pancreatic Cancer UK, allowing us to grow our research community and invest in the future leaders of pancreatic cancer research.

Dr Chris Macdonald

We are planning to open applications for the next round of fellowship funding in early 2023. Sign up to our research newsletter to be the first to hear about upcoming deadlines, events and other news of interest to our research community.

Meet our new Career Foundation Fellows and find out more about their projects

Dr Beatriz Salvador Barbero

Cardiff University  

Identifying the cells of origin that initiate pancreatic cancer as potential early diagnosis markers

 

Dr George Williams

University of Birmingham 

Boronic acid smart hydrogels (BASH): Reducing side effects to save lives

Dr Nasir Haider

CRUK Manchester Institute  

Uncovering and targeting KRAS’s partners in crime in pancreatic cancer

Dr Audrey Lumeau

Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London 

How pancreatic cancer cells shuffle their chromosomes to produce resistance to therapy

Dr Mathias Tesson

CRUK Beatson Institute 

Investigation of ‘normal cells’ in a subset of pancreatic tumours to find personalized treatments that target the whole tumour