Information about fatigue for family and friends

It can be upsetting when someone you love has fatigue, with no energy to do much. But there are lots of ways you can support them. You may need support, too.

What's in the 'Fatigue and pancreatic cancer' section?


It might be difficult for your family member to accept help, and they may worry about losing their independence. Let them know you want to help, and ask what would be useful.

What can I do?

  • Understand how their fatigue is affecting them. Everyone experiences fatigue differently. It can go on for some time after treatment, and it can vary from day to day.
  • You may be able to help them cope emotionally.
  • You can help arrange a specific time each day when they will rest, so that everyone else knows not to disturb them.
  • You can help with household tasks. Ask other family and friends to help, too.
  • You could take on responsibility for organising daily life. For example, paying bills and organising medical appointments.
  • You may take on some caring responsibilities. This might include helping with medicines, cooking, or helping them wash and dress.
  • You may also need to organise professional care.
  • If it isn’t safe for them to drive, you could do the driving. If you are doing a lot of caring, be aware that you might also be very tired. So it may not be safe for you to drive either. Ask other family and friends to help.
  • If they have children, you could help care for them.

Getting support for you

Supporting someone with cancer can be exhausting and upsetting. So it’s important that you get support for yourself as well. You can speak to your family member’s medical team. They will be able to provide you with emotional support, as well as answer your questions.

"Not asking for help will not help you or your loved one. If you don't want to talk to friends or family, talk to the Pancreatic Cancer UK Support Line. They are amazing at just listening." Nadia

We're here for you

We support families as well as the person with pancreatic cancer. If you need support, or have any questions about pancreatic cancer, fatigue, or how to care for your family member, speak to our specialist nurses on our free Support Line.

Speak to our nurses

Order our booklet about caring for someone with pancreatic cancer

We have more information about looking after someone with pancreatic cancer in our booklet: Caring for someone with pancreatic cancer: Information for families and friends.

Order a free copy
An image of the front cover of Pancreatic Cancer UK's booklet, Caring for someone with pancreatic cancer: information for families and carers

Updated October 2022

To be reviewed October 2025